Bariatric Surgery

Post op: Watch out for the speed recovery

“Eat slowly” is one of the strong recommendations within the framework of the bariatric surgery. Historically, this recommendation is particularly explained by the physiological knowledge of surgeons who are familiar with the phenomenon of peristalsis: To “move” in the digestive tract, food is pushed by muscle contractions throughout their journey. Once swallowed, the food goes down into the esophagus, a tube that is about 25 cm long. The esophagus opens onto the stomach, and the junction between the two is controlled by the esophageal sphincter, which relaxes to let the food bolus pass. In the context of obesity surgery, too large a bolus of food may not pass. View https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCB3MrIWMd8&list=PL81029F56DF22EA4A&index=7 for more explanation.

The associated research demonstrates

  • the high prevalence of fast eaters among the candidates for the operation
  • the resumption of average feed speed to 72% of the initial speed (which is clearly beyond the recommendation).

“Eat slowly” is one of the strong recommendations within the framework of the bariatric surgery. Historically, this recommendation is particularly explained by the physiological knowledge of surgeons who are familiar with the phenomenon of peristalsis: To “move” in the digestive tract, food is pushed by muscle contractions throughout their journey. Once swallowed, the food goes down into the esophagus, a tube that is about 25 cm long. The esophagus opens onto the stomach, and the junction between the two is controlled by the esophageal sphincter, which relaxes to let the food bolus pass. In the context of obesity surgery, too large a bolus of food may not pass. View https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCB3MrIWMd8&list=PL81029F56DF22EA4A&index=7 for more explanation.

The associated research demonstrates

  • the high prevalence of fast eaters among the candidates for the operation
  • the resumption of average feed speed to 72% of the initial speed (which is clearly beyond the recommendation).

“Eat slowly” is one of the strong recommendations within the framework of the bariatric surgery. Historically, this recommendation is particularly explained by the physiological knowledge of surgeons who are familiar with the phenomenon of peristalsis: To “move” in the digestive tract, food is pushed by muscle contractions throughout their journey. Once swallowed, the food goes down into the esophagus, a tube that is about 25 cm long. The esophagus opens onto the stomach, and the junction between the two is controlled by the esophageal sphincter, which relaxes to let the food bolus pass. In the context of obesity surgery, too large a bolus of food may not pass. View https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCB3MrIWMd8&list=PL81029F56DF22EA4A&index=7 for more explanation.

The associated research demonstrates

  • the high prevalence of fast eaters among the candidates for the operation
  • the resumption of average feed speed to 72% of the initial speed (which is clearly beyond the recommendation).
Péristalistisme
Peristalistism that propels foods
Passage of the bolus
Passage of the bolus at the level of the ring

Recommendations for good practice

“Ingest small amounts of food at each meal and chew slowly”

HAS

“Chew, eat more slowly”

Very fast eaters

The publications study the share of fast or very fast eaters, with episodes of binge eating, among the candidates for bariatric surgery (proportion estimated at 55% and 66%) * studies (1, 2).

Proportion of very fast eater candidates for the operation

* according to study (1) USA 2017
** according to study (2) Australia 2015

Post-surgical meal rate

Study * (3) measures resumption of feeding speed recovery in post-surgery
• Initial speed: 100%
• Speed ​​ 6 weeks after operation: 45%
• Speed ​​after 1 year: 65%
• Speed after 2 years: 72%

“By reducing their feeding speed only in an average ratio of 100 to 72, we can therefore estimate that very fast eaters are at risk of being fast eaters two years after the operation”

View Sab’s experience

Attention! Without help, the old habits are gradually recovering several months after the operation.

The Slow Control Fork

effective for slowing down and chewing more

Scientifically demonstrated:

soffco

2018 Innovation Award – SOFFCO

  • The Slow Control fork slows down fast and very fast eaters.
  • The slow control fork improves the chewing of the bolus before ingestion “bowls made up of smaller particles”.